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NewsGeraldo Riviera reveals he saw UFO while 'stoned on...

Geraldo Riviera reveals he saw UFO while ‘stoned on ecstasy’ and driving a boat off of the Bahamas

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Fox News’ Geraldo Riviera revealed that he once saw a UFO in the Bahamas while he ‘was stoned on ecstasy’.

Riviera and his fellow The Five hosts were discussing the Congress hearing, where a House Intelligence subcommittee and military experts testified about UFOs for the first time in 50 years, when he decided to share his own close encounter.

‘I’ve sailed around the world, I’ve seen a lot of clear skies,’ Rivera said live on-air. ‘I’ve seen satellites, which are kind of spooky, weather balloons stray aircraft. The only time I ever saw a UFO, I was stoned on ecstasy.’

All four of the other pundits burst into laughter before former NFL cheerleader and one of the show’s host Emily Compagno jabbed: ‘You were driving on ectasy?!.’ Jesse Watters, who was leading the panel, then asked Riviera: ‘What did it look like?’ 

‘It looked like a great, big North Star, brighter than the North star and brighter than the horizon,’ Riviera continued. ‘Then I tried to avoid it.’

‘I steered around it, and I went back the other way. It just tracked me everywhere I went.’

Fox News' Geraldo Riviera was vocal about his one-time experience seeing a UFO sighting in the Bahamas while appearing on The Five show after the House subcommittees' hearing on the matter on Tuesday

Fox News’ Geraldo Riviera was vocal about his one-time experience seeing a UFO sighting in the Bahamas while appearing on The Five show after the House subcommittees’ hearing on the matter on Tuesday

Rivera suggested to the channel's viewers that he was under the influence of ectasy while driving a boat off the coast of the Bahamas when he saw the UFO

Rivera suggested to the channel’s viewers that he was under the influence of ectasy while driving a boat off the coast of the Bahamas when he saw the UFO

Panelists on The Five on Fox News discussed the subcommittee's hearing at length on Tuesday, where Rivera (second from left) told his anecdote of his drug-influenced sighting

Panelists on The Five on Fox News discussed the subcommittee’s hearing at length on Tuesday, where Rivera (second from left) told his anecdote of his drug-influenced sighting

Take Me To Your Dealer!: A famous catchphrase and song performed in the eighties that was later seen on posters and T-shirts until the mid-nineties

Take Me To Your Dealer!: A famous catchphrase and song performed in the eighties that was later seen on posters and T-shirts until the mid-nineties

Compagno also weighed in, adding that US Military, Navy and governmental agencies, including NASA, have not ‘ruled out alien influence’ in the UFOs.

The discussion came after a House Intelligence Committee held its first hearing in half a century Tuesday on UFOs. 

The hearing was broadcast to the public through a livestream on Youtube, lasting 90 minutes. Declassified images and video of unidentified aerial phenomena (UAE) were shown and provided by top government officials from the Pentagon, which is part of the Department of Defense. There was also a portion of the hearing that was held behind closed-doors on Tuesday afternoon and the evidence heard there remains classified. 

In the public portion of the hearing, top Pentagon officials showed two declassified videos of mysterious objects flying past planes. One clip was taken from a Navy cockpit in a training area and shows a spherical object floating by the aircraft. Another showed two small triangle-shaped objects flying by the cockpit of an aircraft, spotted through night vision goggles.

The videos were collected as part of ‘unidentified aerial phenomena’ (UAEs) reports that total 400 in recent years and said these objects could’ be connected to extraterrestrial life – even though there is not yet any concrete evidence.

While such unidentified objects could be foreign military aircraft or possibly secret domestic aircraft, yesterday’s hearing suggests that the phenomena has become so big that U.S. defense officials can no longer keep it from the public. 

In one declassified video, showed to the House Intelligence subcommitte on Tuesday, taken from a Navy cockpit shows a mysterious spherical object floating by the aircraft. The footage was shown at Tuesday's hearing

In one declassified video, showed to the House Intelligence subcommitte on Tuesday, taken from a Navy cockpit shows a mysterious spherical object floating by the aircraft. The footage was shown at Tuesday’s hearing

Bray said that officials have encountered no evidence to suggest the UAEs are of extra-terrestrial origin. 'We'll go wherever the data takes us,' he said

Bray said that officials have encountered no evidence to suggest the UAEs are of extra-terrestrial origin. ‘We’ll go wherever the data takes us,’ he said

Last June, Congress requested a report on UAEs and the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (DNI) offered a preliminary assessment focusing on 144 incidents reported by military personnel dating back to 2004.

A top Pentagon official on Tuesday briefly demonstrated the challenge. Scott Bray, deputy director of naval intelligence, stood next to a television to show a short video taken from an F-18 military plane. The video shows a blue sky with passing clouds. In a single frame — which it took several minutes for staff in the room to queue up — there is an image of one balloon-like shape.

‘As you can see, finding UAP is harder than you may think,’ Bray said, using the acronym for ‘unidentified aerial phenomena.’

Rep. André Carson, an Indiana Democrat who chaired the hearing, called on investigators to show they ‘are willing to follow the facts where they lead.’

Rep. Rick Crawford, an Arkansas Republican, noted that the investigations were not ‘about finding alien spacecraft but about delivering dominant intelligence.’

‘The inability to understand objects in our sensitive operating areas is tantamount to intelligence failure that we certainly want to avoid,’ he said.

Pentagon says unidentified objects could be connected to ‘extraterrestrial life’ and the goal is to ‘understand what’s maybe out there’ 

Ronald Moultrie, the undersecretary of defense for intelligence, on Tuesday told a House Intelligence subcommittee on Tuesday that the Pentagon has not ruled out the possibility that these incidents could be connected to extraterrestrial life. 

‘There are elements of our government engaged in … looking for extraterrestrial life,’ Moultrie said. ‘Our goal is not to potentially cover up something, it’s to understand what’s maybe out there.’ 

However, Bray said that officials have encountered no evidence to suggest the UAEs are of extra-terrestrial origin. ‘We’ll go wherever the data takes us,’ he said. 

‘We have eliminated the stigma,’ added Bray. 

‘We are all curious and we seek to understand the unknown. And as a lifelong intelligence professional, I’m impatient. I want immediate explanations for this as much as anyone else. However, understanding can take significant time and effort. It’s why we’ve endeavored to concentrate on this data driven process to derive fact based results,’ Bray said. 

‘We want to know what’s out there as much as you do,’ Moultrie said, adding that he was a fan of science fiction.

‘Yes, I have followed science fiction. I have gone to conventions, I’ll say it on the record. … There’s nothing wrong with that. Don’t necessarily dress up.’

Intelligence Committee chairman Rep. Adam Schiff told the intelligence officials they must ‘share as much as we can with the American people, since excessive secrecy only breeds distrust and speculation.’ 

Lawmakers from both parties say UFOs are a national security concern.

Democratic Rep. André Carson of Indiana, the chairman of the panel holding the hearing, warned in his opening remarks: ‘Unidentified Aerial Phenomena are a potential national security threat. And they need to be treated that way.’ 

‘For too long, the stigma associated with UAPs has gotten in the way of good intelligence analysis. Pilots avoided reporting, or were laughed at when they did. DOD officials relegated the issue to the back room, or swept it under the rug entirely, fearful of a skeptical national security community’.

Rep. Rick Crawford, an Arkansas Republican, noted that the investigations were not ‘about finding alien spacecraft but about delivering dominant intelligence.’

‘The inability to understand objects in our sensitive operating areas is tantamount to intelligence failure that we certainly want to avoid,’ he said.

Last year’s bombshell report in June said data was ‘largely inconclusive’ but most of the incidents definitely involved ‘physical objects.’  Most of the sightings were reported by military pilots. 

In 18 of the incidents, spotters ‘reported unusual UAP movement patterns or flight characteristics,’ including objects that seemed to be flying ‘without discernible means of propulsion.’

Deputy Director of Naval Intelligence Scott Bray points to a video display of a UAP during the hearing

Deputy Director of Naval Intelligence Scott Bray points to a video display of a UAP during the hearing

‘Some UAP appeared to remain stationary in winds aloft, move against the wind, maneuver abruptly, or move at considerable speed, without discernible means of propulsion,’ the report said. ‘In a small number of cases, military aircraft systems processed radio frequency energy associated with UAP sightings.’

After the woefully insufficient report, the Pentagon created a new office to study such incidents – the Airborne Object Identification and Management Synchronization Group (AOIMSG). 

While such unidentified objects could be foreign military aircraft or possibly secret domestic aircraft, today’s hearing suggests that the phenomena has become so big that U.S. defense officials can no longer keep it from the public. 

Pentagon press secretary John Kirby, asked about the hearing last week, said:  ‘We are absolutely committed to being as transparent as we can with the American people and with members of Congress about our perspectives on this and what we’re going to try to do to make sure we have a better process for identifying these phenomena, analyzing that information in a more proactive, coordinated way than it’s been done in the past, and that we also are doing what we need to do to mitigate any safety issues as many of these phenomena have been sighted in training ranges and in training environments.’

Asked if there was any concern the UAPs could be foreign adversaries, he said: ‘We don’t have a view on that,’ but added that the Pentagon was working to form a more organized reporting system. 

‘It’s been sort of ad hoc in the past, in terms of a pilot here and a pilot there seeing something and the reporting procedures haven’t been consistent,’ he added. 

A brief history of the Pentagon’s study of UFOs: 1947 to now

A report of a ‘flying saucer’ over U.S. airspace in 1947 launched a mass hysteria over unidentified foreign objects that sparked federal investigation into the matter.

That year search-and-rescue pilot named Kenneth Arnold reported nine ‘saucer-like things…flying like geese in a diagonal chainlike line’ at speeds exceeding 1,000 m.p.h. near Mount Rainier in Washington State. 

Within weeks, ‘flying saucer’ sightings were reported in 40 other states. 

On July 19, 1952, air traffic controller Edward Nugent at Washington National Airport detected seven slow-moving objects on his radar screen, and he joked to his boss: ‘Here’s a fleet of flying saucers for you.’

Before the end of the night, a pilot reported seeing similar unexplained objects, and radar picked up the objects at two local Air Force bases — Andrews and Bolling. As radar blips showed the objects in restricted air space over the Capitol and the White House, two Air Force F-94 jets scoured Washington, searching for flying saucers. As soon as the F-94s cruised into the area, the blips disappeared from the radar, and they found nothing and returned to base. As soon as they left, the blips reappeared on the radar, according to the Washington Post. 

The late 1940s and early 1950s prompted a mass hysteria of 'flying saucer' UFO sightings. This Nov. 23, 1951 photo from Riverside, Calif. was taken by Guy Marquand, who claimed that he and two friends saw the object fly past at a very high rate of speed, and when it came back, he had his camera ready to make the pictur

The late 1940s and early 1950s prompted a mass hysteria of ‘flying saucer’ UFO sightings. This Nov. 23, 1951 photo from Riverside, Calif. was taken by Guy Marquand, who claimed that he and two friends saw the object fly past at a very high rate of speed, and when it came back, he had his camera ready to make the pictur

Newspaper cartoon drawing of 'flying saucer' objects, after blips appeared on the radar over the Capitol

Newspaper cartoon drawing of ‘flying saucer’ objects, after blips appeared on the radar over the Capitol 

In 1966, a string of unidentified aerial phenomena in Massachusetts and New Hampshire prompted the House Committee on Armed Services to hold a congressional hearing on the matter. 

Following hearings, Congress established the Condon Committee, a group at the University of Colorado funded by the U.S. Air Force from 1966 to 1968 to research unidentified aerial phenomena. 

The Committee eventually became mired in controversy, and some members charged director Edward Condon with bias. In the end the Condon Committee determined there was nothing extraordinary about UFOs, and that further research was unlikely to yield results. 

At the same time, the Air Force was running Project Blue Book, a UFO study done by the U.S. Air Force that ran from 1952 to 1969. 

By the time Project Bluebook ended, it had collected 12,618 UFO reports but concluded that most of them were misidentified natural phenomena, such as stars, clouds or planes and found that most UFO incidents were a) not a threat to national security b) there was no evidence that such ‘unidentified’ sightings represented technological developments beyond modern science  from across the globe. 

Still, 701 of the reports remain ‘unidentified,’ despite detailed analysis. 

With the findings of the Condon Committee, Sec. of the Air Force Robert Seamans brought Project Bluebook to a close because further funding ‘cannot be justified either on the grounds of national security or in the interest of science.’ 

The Air Force has long said it is unlikely to take up any formal study of UFOs again, blaming budget constraints. 

However in 2017 it was revealed that the Air Force underwent a new secret UFO study Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program (AATIP), funded at $22 million from 2007 to 2012. 

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