Tucker Carlson Gets Real About His Regrets in Media, and You Need to Hear It – RedState

There are a lot of figures populating the news media space in 2023, but Fox News’ Tucker Carlson routinely finds himself above the fray. That’s not just because he has a top-rated show, but because he obviously doesn’t formulate his positions based on how popular they will be.

Carlson has taken a lot of flack over the years for not toeing the line, and that includes a lot of incoming fire from the conservative commentariat. His opinions on the conflict between Ukraine and Russia have earned him scorn from some Republicans, and his views on the COVID-19 vaccine were contentious. Carlson’s more recent exposure of footage from January 6th also resulted in gnashing of teeth among GOP politicians.

But whether you agree with him or not on a given issue, I think you have respect that he’s his own person. He’s not just blindly reading party talking points like some others on his network are so obviously doing (you can guess who I’m talking about).

That’s what made the podcast appearance by Carlson that I’m about to share with you so interesting. In it, he gets honest in a way about his regrets in a way so many others would never dream of doing. In my opinion, it’s a must watch for anyone who follows politics.

CARLSON: I’ve spent my whole life in the media, my dad was in the media. That is a big part of the revelation that’s changed my life is that the media are part of the control appartus.

(crosstalk)

Yeah, I know, cause your younger and smarter, and you’re like “yeah.”

But what if you’re me and you spent your whole life in that world, and to look around and all the sudden you’re like “oh wow,” not only are they part of the problem, but I spent most of my life being part of the problem. Defending the Iraq War, like I actually did that. Can you imagine if you did that?

I was a senior in high school back in 2003 when the invasion of Iraq began. I was too busy doing what seniors in high school do to formulate an opinion on George W. Bush’s ill-fated foreign excursion. But being honest, knowing how the herd mindset is pervasive in politics, I probably would have gone along with it as well. Carlson talking about that openly is something a lot of other conservative commentators refuse to do. You’ll still find some that will defend the war to their death (and they are usually the ones defending Libya and Syria as well).

He continued from there, listing out other regrets. Those include calling people names and dismissing people as conspiracy theorists when he should have given them a chance to explain their position. How often does that come into play in today’s political culture? The answer is every single day. The incessant name-calling and the dismissal of anyone who dares to step outside of the chosen narrative is a cornerstone of the current media environment.

CARLSON: For too long, I participated in the culture where I was like, “anyone who thinks outside these pre-prescribed lanes is crazy, is a conspiracy theorist.” And I just really regret that, I’m ashamed that I did that.

Do you want to know why Carlson is so popular? That line right there explains it all. It’s easy to go with the flow and stick to the script. He has the highest-rated show in cable news because he threw those shackles off. It’s that simple, and it’s why the Joy Reids and Chris Wallaces of the world will never be competition.

Even past just critiquing the media, it’s incredibly refreshing to hear someone in the broader political world say “I’m ashamed I did that.” How much of a game-changer would that be if our politicians had that kind of humility and honesty? Instead, everyone just doubles down on failure in hopes whatever problem they have will be brushed away in the next news cycle. It’s exhausting to chronicle, and Carlson shows that not only is there a better way but that you can be at the top of your game while showcasing it.

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